Hampton Creek breathed a sigh of relief this August when their latest product, Just Scramble, was approved by the FDA. Now the product that looked like it may not even make it onto US shelves, despite being made in San Francisco, headed to India this week for its South Asian debut.

The egg-like product is completely vegan, cholesterol free and contains 20% more protein than chickens eggs. Made from mung beans, the product allows people to enjoy 100% plant-based scrambled eggs.

This past week, Just Scramble has been undergoing taste testing by a number of vendors in several Indian cities, including New Delhi. Among the Just Scramble team was Kaimana Chee, a chef who has appeared on several TV shows in America.

Just Scramble joins a host of plant-based products being trialed across Asia. Just recently, the Singaporean government invested in Impossible Foods, creators of the plant-based Impossible Burger. Thanks to entrepreneur David Yeung, Hong Kong has embraced the Beyond Burger, known as the future burger. Yeung’s plant-based supermarket, Green Common, even stocked vegan mooncakes, for this year’s Mooncake Festival, despite the pastries traditionally containing a number of animal products.

Asia’s willingness to embrace plant-based alternatives will be positive news for environmentalists given that the continent is set to play a major part in the future of animal agriculture. Recent years have seen a rise in the wealth of individuals across Asia, particularly South East Asia, and with this wealth has come a greater demand for a westernized diet, a diet higher in animal products.

Ultimately we want India’s largest and most innovative food companies to join us on our journey,’ a spokesperson for Hampton Creek said. ‘We think India is well-positioned to be one of the first international markets to debut Just Scramble and help bring about large-scale, permanent adoption of healthier and more sustainable food.’

Although this product is set to debut in the US next year, Hampton Creek has said that it is currently exploring ‘potential markets for an eventual international launch.

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