Mouth-Watering Malaysian Jackfruit Satay with Peanut Sauce

Ain’t gonna lie, mock meat does have its lure every now and then. It’s not that I miss meat, it’s just fun to switch things up sometimes. There are some mock meats made in ways that stay in the “safe” zone… predictive mockery in the form of crispy duck, char siew (barbecued pork), prawns, and satay, just to name a few. Despite the novelty of it all, I have wondered about less processed variations of these products. And in true spirit of Hari Raya, I’ve decided to explore the latter and with an ingredient so cheap and abundant, I’m shocked that making this is not already a thing in Malaysia.

Jackfruit is not going to completely replace meat in the form of protein, containing a bit less than 2 grams for every 100 grams. However, jackfruit hugely makes up for this in other ways, being one of the rare plant-based sources of B-complex nutrients including niacin, vitamin B6, riboflavin, and folic acid. It also has vitamin C, vitamin A, and minerals like iron, magnesium, and potassium.

When ripe, jackfruit flesh is bright orange, ridiculously sweet with an alluring pungency and a taste that seems to be a mix of papaya and pineapple… Maybe a bit of banana… Maybe a tinge of mango? Let’s just say it’s pretty darn fruity. When unripe, jackfruit flesh is an unpretentious creamy shade of white, is close to tasteless, and has a fibrous, crunchy texture… the PERFECT natural meat substitute.

Heads up: this recipe needs a LOT of time and a LOT of patience. It’s just as labor-intensive as making normal satay…

… Including marinating time!

You will need a grill appliance of some sort for this recipe. I have a sandwich maker that has changeable cooking plates.

As impressive as this meatless satay is, it doesn’t even make half a statement without its captivating co-star. This kuah kacang (peanut sauce) brings out the true Malaysian authenticity of this dish. Thick and chunky, this literal awesomesauce is proper legit straight-outta-Kajang material.

Serve alongside Nasi Impit (compressed rice cakes) and chopped cucumber and onion, and you’ve got yourself a winning ensemble of colors, textures, flavors, and a hefty virtual award for kitchen tenacity.

Seriously, seeing and tasting the final results is an incredible feeling. And your guests will be scratching their heads, wondering how you made the impossible, possible.

A labor-intensive project but worth the effort and patience, these succulent grilled skewers made with unripe jackfruit are reminiscent of chicken satay and go perfectly with savory sweet peanut sauce. Some extra hands in the kitchen may ease the process – or at least make it feel less tedious!


This recipe was republished with permission from Davina Da Vegan.