Oumph!’s Plant-Based Meat Is Now on the LEGOLAND Windsor Resort Menu
LEGOLAND Windsor Resort is now serving plant-based meat from Oumph!

LEGOLAND Windsor Resort now serves vegan burgers and pulled meat made by multi-award-winning Swedish plant-based meat brand Oumph!.

The Oumph! Burger and Pulled Oumph! are both available in selected dishes at The Tournament Tavern in the park’s LEGOLAND Castle Hotel as well as the Bricks Restaurant at the LEGOLAND Resort Hotel. 

“We pride ourselves on offering our guests a diverse menu selection,” Chris Ireland, Commercial and Hotel Director at the LEGOLAND Windsor Resort, said in a statement. He added that the demand for meat-free options at the park has gone up. This is true to major theme parks as well: Disney recently launched 400 plant-based dishes at its U.S. theme parks.

The Oumph! Burger is made from soy and contains 14 grams of plant-based protein per patty. It also includes beets for a juicy, meaty appearance and texture. Like the burger, the pulled meatcalled Pulled Oumph!is made from soy protein. It has a texture similar to shredded pork or chicken. 

“We’re pleased to see that a family-focused establishment like LEGOLAND have chosen Oumph! to add value to their menu,” said Nick Jacobs, Head of Sales for Oumph! in the UK. “This will be very welcome for the ever-increasing number of Oumph! fans among vegetarians, vegans, flexitarians, and meat-reducers.”

 LEGOLAND Just Launched Vegan Burgers and Pulled Meat
Oumph! burgers are available at LEGOLAND

Plant-Based Meat for a Sustainable Future

Oumph! was founded in 2015 by Anders Wallerman and Anna-Kajsa Lidell as part of the Swedish company, Food For Progress, which aims to establish a sustainable global food system

Data from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN show that animal agriculture accounts for 14.5 percent of all global greenhouse gas emissions. But plant-based meat consumption is on the rise as consumers seek more planet-friendly options. According to global management consulting firm AT Kearney, plant-based meat will make up more than 30 percent of the global meat market by 2030.

Flexitarianism is on the rise across the globe. According to market research firm Mintel, plant-based food sales are expected to reach £1.1 billion in the UK alone by 2024. Thirty-nine percent of British people are actively reducing their meat consumption and nearly half of consumers agree that eating fewer animal products is good for the environment. New Mintel research shows that a quarter of millennial Brits say that they find plant-based food more appealing because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Oumph! wants to be part of the solution by offering delicious, low-impact plant-based meat. Its products are available in the Nordic countries, the Netherlands, Ireland, and the UK, where it is available in Asda, Tesco, Whole Foods Market, and independent supermarkets. Its range includes the burger, pulled meat, ribs, kebabs, chunks, and frozen pizza. 

Oumph! was acquired by the LIVEKINDLY Collective in June. The collective also owns the lifestyle platform LIVEKINDLY and plant-based brands LikeMeat and The Fry Family Food co. The LIVEKINDLY Collective, founded by food industry veterans, has a mission that aligns with Oumph!’s: to make plant-based eating the new normal.

“The LIVEKINDLY Collective is proud to partner with LEGOLAND in bringing more plant-based options to consumers,” said Kees Kruythoff, the LIVEKINDLY Collective’s CEO and Chairman. “This healthy and sustainable movement continues to grow and we’re thrilled to be a part of that by offering people delicious options like Oumph!

Oumph! is available at LEGOLAND Resort Windsor starting today.

To learn more about Oumph!, visit the website.


This is a sponsored post.

Senior Editor | New York City, NY | Contactable via: kat@livekindly.com

Kat has been writing about veganism, environment, and sustainability for five years. Their interests include over-analyzing the various socioeconomic forms of oppression, how that overlaps with veganism, and how the media in all of its forms reflects the current culture.