Writer and Editor | London, UK | Contactable via: jemima@livekindly.co

New data has surfaced that states 56 percent of people in Britain between the ages of 16 and 29 have tried a plant-based diet in the past 12 months, while 45 percent of people in their 30s and 40s did the same, The Sun reported.

A poll conducted by Kellogg’s questioned 2,000 adults on their eating habits and uncovered a surprisingly high number of Brits had experimented with veganism in the last year. Almost a third of those surveyed said they adopted their vegan diet for animal welfare reasons. Another 29 percent ditched animal products over concerns about weight. Four percent of people said they had been motivated to try veganism after seeing celebrities speaking out about the cause.

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Kellogg’s senior nutritionist, Laura Street, said the brand’s new range of vegan cereals was prompted by consumers wanting to reduce animal product consumption but not knowing what to eat. She told The Sun: “Many people are turning to plant-based diets to support a better lifestyle but it can be difficult to stick to. Our research showed that a quarter of new vegans find it hard to know what to eat. That’s why, as part of our Better Starts Plan to help families make healthier choices, we have developed a new range of vegan cereals.”

The Sun stated that just 28 percent of poll participants found following a plant-based diet “too difficult,” implying that a majority of people remained committed to the cause. A majority (72 percent) of those who gave up the lifestyle said that the support of their friends and family would have helped them last longer.

Some people noted they missed meat and dairy or encountered difficulty with knowing what foods to eat. These issues are increasingly being combatted by the influx of animal-free food items that deliver the taste of meat and dairy. This is furthered by the increased presence of vegan companies, such as Sweet Earth, JUST, and Follow Your Heart, to highly popular non-vegan businesses adding plant-based options, such as McDonald’s, Dominos, Pizza Hut, and a string of major supermarkets, including Tesco and Sainsbury’s in the UK, Trader Joes in the US, and Woolworths in Australia.

The vegan population around the world is surging more than ever. Data from earlier this year found that the number of vegans in the UK has increased by 700 percent in the past two years alone. Similarly, the vegan population in the US boosted 600 percent in the last three years. Plant-based Aussies recently reached record highs, and meat consumption in China has declined.